Comrades

As far as the gender division within the feminist movement, it is still very apparent. Hooks raises several facts in examining this gap. Women have so far, in a way, made feminism “women’s work.”  It can be easy to believe that only women can understand the gender gap in society, but we cannot gain equality if men remain the powerful group.  Bell hooks is saying that we must unify and acknowledge our diversity rather than exclude men from feminist activism.  Separatism didn’t work in the 80s because women can’t do this on their own.  We did accomplish a lot without male help in the past, but at this point in time we need both genders involved in the feminism movement.  Today, compared to the 80s, feminist women are much more accepting of men in the “ranks” of feminist protest and activism.  I don’t think that we can get much further with gender equality in the future without the help of men.  Even though men do not experience the discrimination women feel in the world, they do have eyes and they can see what is happening.  Research proves the gender gap and the glass ceiling to be true and men can’t ignore it any longer.  Feminists have said that they “don’t need a man” in the past, but we do need them now.  We need them to stand next to us in this fight. We need them to be our “comrades” in this fight.

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2 thoughts on “Comrades

  1. I agree with you fully because men do have to realize that the wage gap between gender is real and something needs to be done. A lot of men have no clue that the wage gap is at 77 cent and the ones that do know are so high on the totem pole they have no care because they are protected by the glass ceiling.

  2. While I agree with your statements, I also think that you should take a look at this and think about non-binary gendered people, as this is a topic that the feminist movement has also had struggles with in the past, ignoring and minimizing the struggle of trans* people and genderqueer people has created major rifts in feminist ideologies in the past and continues to do so today, much as the exclusion of lesbians at one point created rifts in the feminist movement.

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